Sudipta Chanda

Mr. Sudipta Chanda - the writer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

in a freewheeling chat with ace accordionist

K Bharat

Shri K Bharat

Childhood days…
I was born in Madhavpur (Gujarat) into a family blessed with six brothers and four sisters. We lost our father and mother early on. It was our elder brother, Narendra, who took on the responsibility of bringing us up… he was finishing the last year of his LLB degree.

Growing up with music…
It was the legendary composer duo of Shankar-Jaikishan who inspired me. The music in Barsaat made me go crazy. I at once decided to pursue a career in music. Besides them, the songs rendered by Mukhesh and Dula Bhagat (the famous bhajan singer) also inspired me.

Early lessons…
It was ace accordionist Dheeraj (also from the same village) who helped me to deal with the intricacies of the instrument. Initially I tried my hand at playing the harmonica and then the bulbul tarang when I was in school (played the national anthem on the bulbul tarang at school). I am a self-taught musician. But Dheeraj taught me many of tricks of the trade.

The big break…
It was Gaurang Vyas, a brilliant composer from Gujarat, who offered me a break. I accompanied the legendary singer Manna Dey on his studio album that featured the super hit Hututu. Then I met Mukesh in 1966 through Dheeraj.

Any anecdotes…
Probably very few of us know that Mukesh was an ace composer. It was during a show in Delhi that a few of the organisers asked him to come up with songs based on new lyrics that were provided just before the show. And he did it. I was in charge of the arrangement.

Working with the legends…
I worked with Mukesh since 1966 (till his death). Later he asked me to join the Cine Musicians’ Association. I went on to accompany Jaikishan (where he rendered Jaane Kahan Gaye Who Din) besides Mukesh ( Jeena Yahan Marna Yahan) on a show at Sanmukhanand Hall in Mumbai. Then I worked with composers like Salil Chowdhury, Laxmikant-Pyarelal, Kalyanji-Anandji, RD Burman, Rajesh Roshan, Bappi Lahiri and even new-age composers like Nadeem-Shravan and Anand-Milind.

Memorable songs…
It is very difficult for me to recall all of them… Mere Angne Mein (Lawaris/ Kalyanji-Anandji), Apni Toh Jaise Taise (Lawaris/Kalyanji-Anandji), Dushman Na Kare Dost Ne Woh (Akhir Kyun/Rajesh Roshan), Gori Ho,Kaali Ho (Biwi O Biwi/RD Burman)…

Non-film ventures…
I did albums like Mausam (with Ali Chikatai) and a bhajan album with Anup Jalota. I have also worked with OP Nayyar on his studio album with Penaz Masani and then on Kumar Sanu’s albums (a tribute to Kishore Kumar, released on Venus). I also tried my hand at playing my instrument on umpteen jingles composed by Harish Bhimani, Vanraj Bhatia, Nathan, Kersi Lord and many others.

Idols…
Shankar-Jaikishan … they are brilliant composers. They started a new trend in the Indian popular music scene. Many say all the “jaw-dropping experiments” took place in the 1970s. But I think Shankar-Jaikishan offered a new dimension to Indian film music. Just try to recall the qawali from Arzoo, a perfect example of fusion music. They introduced a unique “toing-toing” sound with the song Itni Badi Mehfil Aur Ek Dil (played on the Spanish guitar/Dil Apna Aur Preet Parayee) that emerged again much later during the 1980s in the Bappi Lahiri era. I also respect Ramprasad Sharma who taught me about staff notation and Dheeraj my guru.

Current trends in music…
There is no life in the music of this generation. But I do believe composers are not responsible for it. Is any film being made that requires great compositions?

Favourite voices…
I respect Mukesh the most besides Rafi, Manna Dey, Hemant Kumar, Lata and Asha. Then there are Udit Narayan, Abhijeet, Shreya Ghosal and Sunidhi Chauhan.

These days…
There is a chance that I would assist my musician brother on the tracks of X-Factor.

COURTESY :

http://www.thestatesman.net/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=363631&catid=47