[This excerpts is taken from a post by Shri subramaniamviswanathan (subramaniamviswanathan@yahoo.com) addressed to shankarjaikishan@yahoogroups.com]

Shanker & Jaikishen both were romantic, but to my ears, Shankar-ji’s baton seemed to have those little extra flourishes that added a bit more colour, a bit more of that overwhelming heady effect, mainly through the use of his multi-layered violins, that seemed to diverge in different levels like some wildly flowing waterfall but converged gloriously in unision merging seamlessly with the singers’ voice—and continued to flow at the background throughout the song! It is this ornate trade-mark `dressing up’ of the song that had always identified to my ears the `S-J brand’. Maybe occasionally I would have mistaken some of Jaikishen’s compositions to be of some other MDs like Roshan, or vice-versa, but with Shankar-ji’s songs, it was instant recognition! It is fascinating, the way he could infuse so much glamour and glitter in a `halka-phulka’ song ( to use his own adjective) by the sheer use of extra-ordinarily imaginative orchestra! `Raatke hamsafar, `Na main hoon main’, `Ai chandki zebaai’ and countless other songs are testimonies to the fact that Shankar-ji was indeed an incurable `Romantic’, which was belied by his `no-nonsense’ serious demeanor ! I hope I am not mistaken in assuming that these are Shankar-ji’s tunes.

Jaikishen to Shanker -- "Don't worry I am here for you"   (photo courtesy:shankarjaikishan Group on Yahoo)

Jaikishen to Shanker -- "Don't worry I am here for you" (photo courtesy:shankarjaikishan Group on Yahoo)

This in no way suggests
that
Jaikishen’s
tunes
were
anyShanker ji on a page of MOVIE magazine (May 1986 issue) in a article(Contributed by Dr. Raj Senani of Yahoo Group) less `romantic’! Unka andaz bhi kuch alag-hi nirala tha! I feel that Jai preferred to tone down the orchestra a bit, but flashed the brilliance of each instrument one at a time, rather than creating `the cock-tail goonj effect’ which was essentially Shankar-brand, in my humble opinion. Open to corrections.

I am just listening to `Woh chale haan who chale’ from `Hamrahi’, which I guess is Jai’s typical style. I am no expert in music, but I learnt a bit, how to savour an `S-J song’ bit by bit, thanks to the article by Anand-ji forwarded by Shahrukh-bhai! So I relished the beauty of this under-rated song right from the quick introductory Sitar, followed by a violin piece, then the sudden silence of instruments handing over the mike to Rafi Saab, Rafi’s grace of uttering `jhatakke daaman meri aarzoo mitake mitalke’— then those wonderful `dholaks’ taking off and drumming and gently massaging the insides of your brain! The pattern continues through the antaras and after the delightfully playful Sitar/Violin/ Flute interludes, as you immerse in Rafi’s sincere appeal `Koi itna unse keh de ki main unhika ho chukka hoon’ and come to `Unhe kya milega aakhir—`, the instruments go silent again and you are already in happy anticipation of the `dholaks’ to strike right at the instant of Rafi’s repetition, `jalaake jalaake—`! Then they go again, `dhag dhig—`!
The `larger-than- life’ heady flourishes of a Shankar song may be missing, but the solo-play of each instrument is distinct and absolutely charming!
Enjoy this song again which makes even a Rajendra Kumar swing to the rhythm, apart from his usual style of alternatingly raising his both hands!
http://www.youtube. com/watch? v=pxhvoeoNPYc

‘Na bujhegi badalon-se, na bujhegi baar baar sun-ne-se
Mere dil-ke dhadkanon-mein gaye ‘Craze’ jo lagaake lagaake woh chale!
Haan S-J chale—‘!!

Musically Yours,
S.V.Nathan

Shanker ji on a page of MOVIE magazine (May 1986 issue) in a article(Contributed by Dr. Raj Senani of Yahoo Group)